× Close

📚 Departmental Project and Seminar Proposal Topics with Materials
Accounting Topics
Banking and Finance Topics
Civil Engineering Topics
Computer Engineering Topics
Computer Science Topics
Curriculum Studies Topics
Economics Topics
Economics Education Topics
Education Topics
English Education Topics
English Language Topics
Entrepreneurship Topics
Estate Management Topics
Guidance and Counselling Topics
📚 (2023) Project / Seminar Proposal Topics and Materials

Search for Project and Seminar Topics Post Advertisement Items for Promotion
Anonymous
The Use of Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Malaria Among Pregnant Women

The Use of Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Malaria Among Pregnant Women

Project / Seminar Material
Reference ID: PS-211-TM

DEDICATION

This research work titled "The Use of Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Malaria Among Pregnant Women" is dedicated to God for his enabling grace and to all computer enthusiasts who help to make life a pleasant experience.





i

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I owe my indebtedness to my Supervisor (Name of your Supervisor), the Head of Department (Name of your HOD), the Lecturers in the department of Applied Science, Book Authors and Profound Scholars of existing/related research work for your moral support that facilitated the successful completion of my (Tertiary Institution level). I am grateful to God Almighty and my parent for their financial support in my career. I really appreciate you all for everything, Thank you very much.





ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRELIMINARY PAGES

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

  • 1.1 Background …

CHAPTER TWO

LITERATURE REVIEW

  • 2.1 Introduction

CHAPTER THREE

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

  • 3.1 Introduction

CHAPTER FOUR

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

  • 4.1 Introduction

CHAPTER FIVE

SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Summary
  • 5.3 Conclusion
  • 5.4 Recommendation

REFERENCES




iii


The Use of Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Malaria Among Pregnant Women

CHAPTER ONE

1.0 Introduction
Malaria is a life threatening parasitic disease transmitted by female Anopheles mosquitoes. In Nigeria, malaria is responsible for around 60% of the out-patient visits to health facilities, 30% of childhood death, 25% of death in children under one year and 11% of maternal deaths (National Population Commission, 2008; Noland et al., 2014). Similarly, about 70% of pregnant women suffer from malaria, which contributes to maternal anemia, low birth weight, still births, abortions and other pregnancy-related complications (Federal Ministry of Health Abuja, 2005).
Presently, malaria remains one of the worst menaces of tropical countries of the world. It is a killer and debilitating disease that affects the physical and economic well-being of people living in endemic areas of Africa (WHO, 2008). Pregnant women are among those in the higher risk group (Okwa, 2003). Recent global estimate shows that there are between 300 — 500million clinical cases of malaria and between 1.50 — 2.70million deaths attributed to malaria annually (Greenwood, 2005). Pregnant women are at immense risk of malaria due to natural immune depression in pregnancy (Fievet, 2008). Hence, it is one of the most important health issues affecting pregnant women as it has a risk of jeopardizing the life of the woman or the fetus (WHO, 2010).
Traditional herbal medicine could be described as “herbs, herbal materials, herbal preparations and finished herbal products whose content includes active ingredients parts of plants, or other plant materials, or combinations”. Herbal medicines can be in the form of liquids, powder, capsules, tablets or ointments. Some are pre-packaged while others are prepared when needed and are used not only to cure illness but to maintain or boost one's health (WHO, 2002). In Africa, reliance on herbal medicines is relatively high and the global use of herbal medicine is growing. Most pregnant women believe that these medicines are ‘natural' and ‘safe' com­pared to modern drugs. Besides, traditional medicine is believed to treat medical problems and improve health status during pregnancy, birth and postpartum care in many rural areas (Khadivzadeh and Ghabel, 2012).
Erhun, Agbani and Adesanya, (2004) opted that many pregnant women that are involved in such practice acquire the knowledge from relatives, neighbours, friends, traditional medicine dealers and sometimes media (Shah, 2004). The situation is predominant due to the limited antenatal health delivery centers and defective functional health institutions (Rohra, 2008); poor medical services and attitude of medical staff; lack of professional control of pharmaceutical products (Abrahams and Jewkes, 2002) as well as high illiteracy level and cost of synthetic malaria medicine over traditional orthodox ones (Dossou-Yov, 2001).
In addition, several factors such as; socioeconomic status of the women, poverty issues, cultural perception, age, sex, income level, religion and belief of certain diseases' entity and their perceived responses to indigenous medications have been widely reported as indicators that influences their attitude (WHO, 2002); Hence, herbal traditional medication for curing malaria has become a norm and is widely practiced and patronized by pregnant women owing to general ease of access, social and cultural influences, perceived efficacy and beliefs about its safety (Langloid-Klassen, 2007).
Kyomuhendo (2005) noted that pregnant women decisions regarding health and antenatal care attendance are influenced by the patriarchal system of society that gives men control over resources to the disadvantage of women. This study therefore, aims at examining The Use of Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Malaria Among Pregnant Women in Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria.

1.1 Statement of the Problem
Malaria infection during pregnancy is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical regions throughout the world and Nigeria in Particular. The burden of malaria infection during pregnancy is caused mainly by Plasmodium falciparum, the most common malaria species in Africa (WHO, 2010). Pregnant women and the unborn children are particularly vulnerable to malaria, which is a major cause of prenatal mortality, low birth weight, and maternal anaemia (Greenwood, 2007). Malaria during pregnancy compounds or provokes anaemia, which, when severe, increases the risk of maternal death (estimated at around 10,000 deaths annually), low birth weight (linked to around 100,000 annual infant deaths in Africa), pre-term delivery, congenital infection and reproductive loss of overwhelming morbidity and mortality (Fakeye, 2009).
There have been a considerable number of reports about poor knowledge, attitudes, and practices among pregnant women relating to malaria and its control from different parts of Africa. The disease remains the world's most important tropical health challenge. Access to medical care is limited in many malaria-endemic areas and where medical services exist, they commonly lack facilities for laboratory diagnosis, and treatment option. This forces these pregnant women to use various forms of substances and traditional herbs for curing malaria.

1.2 Purpose of the Study
The main objective of the study is to examine The Use of Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Malaria Among Pregnant Women in Abraka, Delta State. While, the specific purpose includes;
  1. To determine influence of socio-economic status on the use of traditional herbs in the treatment of malaria among pregnant women.
  2. To find out the extent to which the age of pregnant women determine the use of traditional herbs for the treatment of malaria.
  3. To find out the extent to which the level of education of pregnant women determine the use of traditional herbs for the treatment of malaria.
  4. To examine the extent to which the locality of pregnant women determine the use of locally made herbs for treatment of malaria.

1.3 Research Question
The following research questions were raised in this study;
  • What is the difference in socio-economic status on the use of traditional herbs in the treatment of malaria among pregnant women?
  • What is the difference in the ages of pregnant women on the use of traditional herbs for the treatment of malaria?
  • What is the difference in the level of educational background of pregnant women in the use of traditional herbs for the treatment of malaria?
  • What is the difference in the locality of pregnant women in the use of traditional herbs for the treatment of malaria?

1.4 Research Hypotheses
The following null hypotheses were formulated in the study:
  1. There is no significant difference between the Socioeconomic status in use of traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria among pregnant women in Abraka.
  2. There is no significant difference between the age groups in the use of traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria by of pregnant women in Abraka.
  3. There is no significant difference between the levels of Education in the use of traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria among pregnant women in Abraka.
  4. There is no significant difference between Urban and Rural areas in the use of traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria by pregnant women in Abraka

CHAPTER TWO

2.0 Literature Review

2.1 Introduction

This chapter focuses on the review of related literature. A literature review includes the current knowledge as well as theoretical and methodological contributions to a particular topic. It documents the state of the art with respect to the topic you are writing. It surveys the literature in the topic selected. In this research work the literature review includes the …

Summary Headlines for The Use of Traditional Medicine in the Treatment of Malaria Among Pregnant Women



    NEED HELP? CALL US 24/7:
    +234 803 051 1988